Conversion – Pat Falguera, SJ

Luke 11:37-41, Tuesday of Week 28 in Ordinary Time “God sees the Truth but Waits” is the title of a short story written by Leo Tolstoy. It is owing to the genius of this great Russian writer that the themes of  mercy and  forgiveness; and of condemnation and conversion, continue to influence thought and action…

Time to Fly – Arnel Aquino, SJ

Luke 10:25-37, Monday of Week 27 in Ordinary Time Once upon a time there was a king who received a gift of two peregrine falcons. They were the most magnificent birds he had ever seen. He entrusted them to his falconer who promptly trained them to hunt. After several months, king and falconer noticed that…

Original Blessedness – Arnel Aquino, SJ

Luke 1:39-56, The Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary When you and I were children, oh, 500 years ago, our elders taught us that Mary was “taken up to heaven, body and soul.” Why was that special? Well, “when ordinary people like us die,” our elders said, “our souls go to heaven, leaving our bodies…

Role Model – Freddie Balinong, SJ

Luke 1:39-56, The Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary The Assumption — long since a celebration of the Blessed Virgin Mary in the church calendar: in fact, a celebration of God’s merciful power underlying all the mysteries of our faith. God alone could exempt—as He did exempt—the Blessed Virgin Mary from the imperious law of…

Fiat – Mon Bautista, SJ

Luke 2:41-51, Feast of the Immaculate Heart of Mary Today’s Gospel on Mary’s fiat reminds me of this true story of Archbishop Fulton Sheen (former Archbishop of Rochester, New York). He said that one day, while on a flight from New York to Chicago, he met this very beautiful flight attendant. And he told her,…

Were Not Our Hearts Burning Within Us? – Nemy Que, SJ

Luke 24:13-35, 3rd Sunday of Easter Today’s Gospel reading belongs to the Easter stories that abound soon after the resurrection of Jesus. That same day Jesus rose from the dead, two disciples were making their way to a village named Emmaus. They were talking about the events that took place during the past days. Like…

Emmaus and the Church in Distress – Fr Harold Parilla

Luke 24:13-35, 3rd Sunday of Easter It is now the third Sunday of Easter but the atmosphere is strangely quiet. The streets are not as crowded and the malls are closed. It feels like the Holy Week of my childhood except that the churches too are inaccessible. Donagh O’Shea said that the Emmaus story featured…

The Gift of Emmaus – Johnny Go, SJ

Luke 24:13-35, 3rd Sunday of Easter “We had hoped….” We can hear the disappointment in the two disciples’ voices as they spoke to the stranger on the road. “We had hoped…” In other words, they no longer did. What’s striking, however, is that these two had already heard of the empty tomb found not only by the…

How Do We Return To Jerusalem Changed? – Francis Alvarez, SJ

Our Gospel today, Luke 24:13-35, begins with two disciples of Jesus journeying to Emmaus. They must have been dejected. Wasn’t Jesus supposed to redeem Israel? How could one then make sense of his gruesome death on the cross? They might have been distraught. If they had left everything to follow Jesus, what was going to…

Our Emmaus:Walks, Meals and Runs – Pat Nogoy, SJ

Luke 24:13-35, 3rd Sunday of Easter Some walks can be hard and long. Especially for those whose hopes and lives have been shattered to pieces. Robbed of life’s coherence, two disciples can only return and make their way home. Home is a familiar and comfortable place where they can somehow piece some fragments together into…

Should We Celebrate Easter? – Madz Tumbali, SJ

Easter Sunday 2020 I remember a story by then Jesuit Conference for East Asia and Oceania President Fr Adolfo Nicolas about his home province, Japan, told when I was a novice. Hiroshima, 8:15 in the morning of 6 August 1945, an American B-29 Bomber dropped “Little Boy” on the city. The bombing immediately wiped out…

Family Priest – Mark Lopez, SJ

Luke 2:22-40, Feast of the Lord’s Presentation Today’s feast reconnects us to our Jewish ancestors in the faith, through their tradition of offering their first-born son to be the priest of the family. How beautiful that would be for us today – a priest in every family. No, not necessarily the ordained kind. But the…